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On Our Watch: Creating confidence in the future

(2019 Summer Series, Blog #5)

Since Matt moved into First Place–Phoenix, we’ve learned that when the skills, training and infrastructure are in place, so much is possible!

Still, we can’t (yet!) claim that everything is perfect for Matt; we still have plenty of things to worry about. His breakthrough seizures persist every six to eight weeks. I’m still pondering foolproof plans for cutting Matt’s fingernails and toenails every week (and checking for hangnails, too). We’re also working with First Place staff on a system for how Matt can take note of empty household and depleted grocery items and add them to his shopping list via his indispensable Alexa Echo.

And let’s not forget oh-so-important family discussions, wills, medical records and myriad other items, including ongoing updates with his state-appointed support coordinator and services providers.

As the next chapters unfold, we are making new lists of priorities and taking our next big steps with Matt.  We are preparing for his daily life and beyond, because we realize stuff changes—and so do we. Who among us is still working at our very first job, living in our first home or lucky enough to still be with their first love? (I proudly claim that last one!)

And yet, we’ve made exciting progress. Matt can live at First Place during the week and enjoy weekends at our home. He can join us for a vacation or find that he often prefers a staycation. He can hang with friends when he chooses for lunch, dinner or games of UNO or Scrabble. Based on this week’s schedule of bingo, bowling, “Beautiful Beats” drumming class (SUPER popular!) and The Beatles karaoke, I’d say we’re on our way.

What we all need are options and choices and ways to make decisions, so that we can support ourselves and those we love through family, friends, friends who become our family and a supportive community—a community that understands how to support Matt professionally through his therapy, personally through his life skills and more casually when a stranger spots him needing help in the grocery store or perhaps because he has lost his way.

While there’s still a lot of work to do, we’re getting closer to allaying our biggest worry of all about the future: wondering how Matt’s life will be like without us. After 28 years—26 of those post-diagnosis—of living with Matt, we’re now in a position to ensure that he can have a meaningful, safe and enjoyable life. Matt is learning how to live his life (with support), while we’re exploring ways to live ours—all thanks to having choices.

Up next, blog #6 of our summer series, inspired by a collection of images over the past year reminding us of how far we’ve come!